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Detox Week 5: Shirts are easier to clean on your washboard abs if you don’t add starch to them.

Detox Week 5: Shirts are easier to clean on your washboard abs if you don’t add starch to them.

Keep it up guys. Only two more weeks left! There are two things I want to talk about.

First: Starches and why we are eliminating some of them.

Second: It is time to start thinking about life outside of the detox

Goodbye Starches!

Okay that and the title are a bit misleading. When we created the detox, we looked at the elimination of foods per a bunch of articles we had come across. However, when I dived specifically in to this week of the challenge, I actually found the reverse to be true of most unrefined starches like beans, peas and even rice.

Starches are a type of carbohydrate and many of the foods that contain starches are actually beneficial including various vegetables that are also high in fiber.

But, starches can be a risk. They greatly elevate the blood sugar which can lead to a host of inflammations and medical risks like diabetes.

Because we’ve already eliminated things like potato chips, breads, most cereals, pretzels, etc. most of this week’s work is already done. Except for a few more big ones.

For this part of detox, pay less attention to weight loss and more attention to how cutting out refined starches and making simple substitutions affect inflammations in your body, your body’s ability to heal after a workout and how your stomach feels. I’d be interested to see if it impacts anyone greatly.

Foods we are going to particularly focus on:

Any refined starches still in your diet – This can include sweeteners (drink your coffee black like a man), instant oatmeal (natural rolled oats are still acceptable. These are the ones that come in the big cylinders in the grocery store), corn flour, high fructose corn syrup, granola bars, powerbars, cliff bars, etc.

Pasta – try to cut it out all together but if you must eat it, make sure it is whole wheat pasta. Another great substitute is spaghetti squash. I was reluctant to eat this but when I did, I found it to have a comparable texture and was a little bit sweeter than actual pasta. The only thing that drives me nuts still is that because of it’s high water content, adding sauce makes for a watery, messy meal.

Rice – Switch out white rice for brown rice and avoid fried rice at all costs.

Potatoes – try switching to sweet potatoes, which despite their misleading name, actually wreak less havoc on your blood sugar levels.

Life after detox:

I’ve seen a bit of tailing off in logging daily meals and have even had at least one person flat out express they were quitting. MyFitnessPal is not life but it can offer a good gauge for where we are on a day-to-day and week-to-week basis.

I know when I enter the dinner I plan on having, I pay more attention to how many calories I should think about eating for lunch. Or, if I have a bigger lunch, how I need to refine my dinner. Too many days of loosing track of this leads me to looking forward to the summer detox because I went right back to the same place I was when I started this one. It is a reminder and a plan until good healthy eating is the new norm.

I actually just read an article the other day about a study that showed if people monitored their diets during the week and ate healthy as a result, no normal amount of splurging on the weekends could derail overall weight loss plans or health benefits as long as during the week the participants went back to the strict eating plan.

Keeping a log like MyFitnessPal also allows the guys around you to be aware of your goals and give you a hard time when they see that weight start creeping back up. It is good accountability.

The log can help for your own moderation too as it serves as a reminder that because you downed several slices of pizza on Monday, perhaps it would not be wise to eat fast food on Wednesday and instead opt for a sandwich or salad.

Just a few things to think about.

Sound off below if you have learned anything about your own eating habits during this process and/or what you plan to continue doing after our six weeks is up.

Gator
  • On February 10, 2014

Comments

  1. Smuggler

    Okay, to be honest, giving up breads has been the most difficult. The myfitnesspal app on my phone helps me hold myself accountable. When I log an entire day’s food, I make better choices and net fewer calories. It is too easy to snack if I’m not counting ALL the calories.

  2. Smuggler

    Okay, to be honest, giving up breads has been the most difficult. The myfitnesspal app on my phone helps me hold myself accountable. When I log an entire day’s food, I make better choices and net fewer calories. It is too easy to snack if I’m not counting ALL the calories.

  3. Senator Tressel

    Hardest thing for me is giving up sweets and processed snacks. I ate a ton of that stuff before. I would have something sweet (candy, cookies, chocolate) after just about every meal and in between was something salty and crunchy. About mid way through, I had to cheat with some crackers, but they were whole grain and baked so I didn’t feel too guilty. Having a cheat day is the key. It’s easier for me to stay on track when I know I can indulge once a week.

  4. I thought that giving up bread was going to be the hardest for me. It was hard, but not as hard as giving up rice and pasta. I feel like there is nothing left to eat! (Joke).
    Also realized just how much I was eating at evening snacks. Carrots and Hummus have become my new go to snack in the evening.

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